cob lime and hemp plastering lime and lathwork repair Cumbria lime repointing carpentry breathable paints suppliers and links

jack in the green traditional builders

About us Otter Holt barn conversion near Tiverton

Using traditional materials such as lime, cob/mud, stone and sustainable timber we specialise in the sympathetic restoration, conversion, extension and repair of old/traditional buildings.

Jack in the Green Builders (Glyn Tyler) operate in mid/north Devon and Jack in the Green Lime (David Tyler and Helen Evans) operate from southern Cumbria. David and Helen moved from Devon to Helen's homeland (the South Lakes) in 2008. Whilst we now live and work in different ends of England, we still share some common projects (and a website!). Please see the links at the bottom of our web pages for details of how to contact us.

We at Jack in the Green have the benefit of a number of specialist skills which have informed how we understand and approach the work we undertake. This is based on maintaining and conserving the vernacular buildings and other features which have made our rural and urban landscapes what they are today.

Using both traditional and modern breathable and sustainable eco-materials, we convert, repair and restore houses, cottages, barns, townhouses and other period buildings. We understand not only the importance and historical value of the built environment, but also how the requirements of modern living combine with current environmental and conservation considerations.

cob staircase designed by Alison Bunning, built by Jack in the Green lime rendered dashed and silicate painted house near Carnforth internal limework and oak floor and roof in a cob barn conversion

lime plastered stairwell painted with breathable paint

What we do

We will undertake projects large and small, from cob and lime repairs, lathwork, lime pointing, plastering and rendering to carpentry and full scale barn conversions. To get an idea of the spectrum of services we can offer, browse the website and visit our traditional barn conversion gallery.


Ethical building and conservation

The Jack in the Green logo symbolises our commitment to living with rather than against our local and global environments. We practice both ethical and ecologically sustainable building, and believe in the maintenance of local vernacular building traditions within regional landscapes. Living in rural areas with high property prices, we also support the construction of sustainable eco-housing and self-build projects for local residents. Among other organisations, we are members of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB), The Sustainable Building Association (AECB), The Building Limes Forum, The Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) and The Devon Rural Skills Trust (DRST). Please see our links page for more information about these and other organisations.

limewashed lime render on traditional thatched Devon cottage oak roof by Jake Jackson and Jack in the Green against lime plastered scratch coat lime rendered dashed and silicate painted wall on the Furness peninsula lime rendered dashed and limewashed town house in Ulverston Wall pointed with lime near Seathwaite internal lime plastering

The pre-industrial vernacular buildings which define many areas of the countryside were low impact and sustainable, and their construction was based on maintaining local economies and community traditions. Many of the buildings we work on were originally built by local communities from materials which were readily available.

Lime rendered dashed and limewashed building in north Cumbria undertaken by Lattimer Construction with Jack in the Green

Cob, stone, timber and roofing materials were often derived from nearby fields and woods or small scale rural industries. We try to maintain these traditions by using traditional and where possible, locally sourced and reclaimed materials and through supporting local businesses and craftspeople.

stonework at Worlington war memorial

The availability of cheap mass produced building materials such as cement and gypsum based products in the mid twentieth century brought about the decline of local building traditions and the use of lime mortars. Today, the environmental effects of the past two centuries of large scale industry are beginning to hit home, and we are returning to an understanding of the importance of sustainable technologies and ecologically friendly lifestyles.

Natural materials such as lime are beneficial to older and traditionally constructed buildings. Unlike inflexible modern materials such as cement mortars and gypsums, they allow buildings to breathe, circumventing damp problems and promoting healthier living environments. Many of the damp problems inherent to older houses are exacerbated by inappropriate repairs using modern impermeable cement and gypsum based materials. The use of traditional materials such as lime plasters, renders and mortars can not only be used to solve these problems, they are also much more eco-friendly than the heavily processed materials used in the modern construction industry. Read more about the breathability of lime and its environmentally friendly credentials on our lime page


lime and hemp plastering cob lime repointing lime and lathwork repair breathable paints carpentry Cumbria links and suppliers
Jack in the Green topping out lime and earth mortar used to match existing pointing on stone barn green oak framed summer room near Tiverton
Page last updated by HE 27.11.11

Jack in the Green Builders (Devon) is run by Glyn Tyler. For queries regarding building work in Devon, contact Glyn at jackinthegreenbuilders@gmail.com
or telephone 01884 829584

For general enquiries, advice or information regarding products, specifications or pretty much anything technical, contact Dave at info@jackinthegreenlime.co.uk

Jack in the Green lime (Cumbria) are David Tyler and Helen Evans
Contact us in Cumbria at helen@jackinthegreenlime.co.uk
telephone: 07725 994461 or 07850 752641


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